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All about the Dominican Republic

  • Competition law in the Dominican Republic

    Competition authority

    The competition authority is the National Commission for the Defence of Competition.

    Restrictive agreements and practices

    All practices, acts and agreements between national or foreign economic agents, either tacit or expressly written or verbal, which have the purpose, or either produce or may produce the effect, of imposing unjustified barriers in the market are prohibited (Competition Law).

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  • Tax on Business vehicles

    Tax resident business

    A business entity is considered tax resident, in relation to Dominican-source income, when it qualifies as a permanent establishment. According to the tax laws, a "permanent establishment" is a fixed place of business in which a foreign undertaking, person or entity carries out all or a portion of its activities. This includes management seats, offices, branches and enterprise consulting services, if and when they are present in the Dominican Republic for more than six months within a 12-month period.

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  • Taxes on employment

    Dominican-source income received by an employee for their work, as well as income obtained by individuals who exercise a profession or perform freelance work, is subject to income tax. The rate applicable to income tax ranges from 0 to 25% depending on the income received. Employers must withhold income corresponding to their employees’ income tax and social security contributions on a monthly basis and remit it to DGII by the tenth day of every month. Individuals who receive Dominican-source income for independent work must file an annual individual income tax return by 31 March.

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  • Employment in the Dominican Republic

    Employment

    What are the main laws regulating employment relationships?

    The main employment legislation is the Labour Code (No 16-22 of 1992). It applies to Dominicans and foreign persons working in the Dominican Republic. The employer and employee are subject to an employment contract, although its provisions can never release or limit rights under the Labour Code.

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  • Legal System of Dominican Republic

    The Comptroller General, who is appointed by the President, exercises internal control of the administration and of public funds. The Court of Accounts, whose judges are nominated by the President and elected by the Senate, exercises external control. The President must submit each year’s accounts to the National Congress, which either approves or rejects the statement of earnings from taxes and fees and investment of revenues that the Executive Branch must submit to it.

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  • Local laws and customs

    Don’t become involved with illegal drugs of any kind. There are severe penalties for all drug offences. Cases can take several years to go through the judicial process, during which the accused person is likely to be held in detention. Possession of even small quantities can lead to a long prison sentence and a hefty fine. All sentences are served in the Dominican Republic.

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  • Geography and Climate

    The Dominican Republic is the second-largest country in the Caribbean and is located on the island of Hispaniola. The island, which it shares with Haiti, is situated between Cuba and Puerto Rico. Upon moving to the Dominican Republic, you'll recognize that the landscape is surprisingly diverse for such a small country. Obviously you shouldn't miss out on the white sandy beaches, which are so typical for the Caribbean, but the country also boasts tropical rainforests, beautiful valleys, rivers, lakes, and even semi-desert zones.

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  • Moving to the Dominican Republic

    Does moving to the Dominican Republic sound like an option for you? The country, located on the eastern half of Hispaniola Island, offers much more than just palm trees and sunshine. Read our articles to the Dominican Republic and find out all about the country, visas, housing, and more.
    In any cases, movingto another country is an important decision and there are many things to take into account before packing all your belongings.

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  • The Job Search

    As in most other countries, working in the Dominican Republic requires some determination. Search local newspapers like the Listín Diario for job ads. They are usually listed under "Empleos" but may also be scattered all over the paper. Be sure to skim through the entire newspaper to avoid missing an interesting post. If you come across ads which do not specifically state what the job is about, you should be suspicious. More often than not, these ads are for rather dubious jobs. Your embassy or consulate, as well as your country's chamber of commerce, might also have a list of businesses and companies looking for employees from your home country.

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  • Dominican Republic's Economy

    It hasn't just been the tourism and travel sector but also the establishment of free trade zones that have given the economy a significant boost. The latter have attracted foreign investors, who have contributed to economic growth and created new jobs for locals and foreigners working in the Dominican Republic. These zones mostly focus on production in the fields of textiles, electronics, pharmaceuticals, and tobacco products.

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  • Education in Dominican Republic

    The education system in the country is consisting of 3 main levels: primary, secondary, and higher. Education is free and mandatory from ages 5 to 14. Preschool is not mandatory and were presented in some areas. The different categories of secondary school are sixyear liceo (bachillerato certificate will be given after completion), polytechnics, teacher training and vocational schools. The Secretariat of State for Education and Culture oversees the entire primary and secondary schools. There are most likely 5,684 primary and 1,664 secondary schools.

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We look forward to assisting you in making the right decision of changing your life and empowering your future in the Dominican Republic.