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Entries tagged as transport and schools

  • Education for Expat Children

    If you are planning on living in the Dominican Republic with your family, you'll be happy to learn that there are plenty of educational opportunities for expat children. The many different multinational schools offer instruction in a variety of languages other than Spanish. Schools in the Dominican Republic are based on a Spanish educational model. Both English and French are taught as secondary languages on private and public schools. Haitian Creole is spoken by the population of Haitian origin. However, even at these schools, the majority of the student body might be Dominican, which usually means the language spoken during breaks is Spanish.

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  • Dominican Local Food Culture

    Dominican cuisine is heavily influenced by its Spanish roots but includes a touch of local Caribbean spices and herbs. While spending your life in the Dominican Republic, try some dishes that are prepared a la criolla or guisado, which means the meat or seafood is served in a tomato sauce with garlic, olives, onion, and cilantro.

    Dominicans also particularly enjoy all types of fried dishes such as carne frita (fried pork chunks) or chicharrones de pollo (Dominican fried chicken) with plantains dipped in salt water and fried in vegetable oil. This fondness for fried food is also reflected in a typical Dominican breakfast, which contains mashed plantains (mangú) with onions, fried white cheese, fried eggs, and orange juice.

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  • Education in Dominican Republic

    The education system in the country is consisting of 3 main levels: primary, secondary, and higher. Education is free and mandatory from ages 5 to 14. Preschool is not mandatory and were presented in some areas. The different categories of secondary school are sixyear liceo (bachillerato certificate will be given after completion), polytechnics, teacher training and vocational schools. The Secretariat of State for Education and Culture oversees the entire primary and secondary schools. There are most likely 5,684 primary and 1,664 secondary schools.

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  • Travelling by Bus

    If you don't mind the longer travel times or have a closer destination in mind, buses are an alternative to flying or driving. There are a variety of long-distance bus companies offering connections to various locations around the island on a daily basis. Capital Coach Line, Caribe Tours, and Terra Bus are but a few. A trip to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, for example, costs about USD 40 and takes between six and nine hours on a comfortable, air-conditioned coach.

    Aside from those mentioned, Expreso Santo Domingo Bávaro and Metro also offer domestic connections at reasonable prices. If you are on a backpacker’s budget, don’t mind a lack of luxury, or simply want a really authentic Dominican experience, you may want to give the Guaguas a try. 

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  • Travelling by Air

    Santo Domingo's Aeropuerto Internacional Las Américas is not only the biggest but also the most modern airport in the entire country. Aeropuerto Internacional Punta Cana, however, handles many more passengers, around five million per year. All in all, with Puerta Plata's Aeropuerto Internacional Gregorio Luperón and Santiago's Aeropuerto Internacional Cibao, there are four big airports that handle international flights and are serviced by big airlines. The flag carrier of the country is PAWA Dominicana; however, it does not operate domestic flights, but only handles flights to other Caribbean countries.

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  • Exploring the Dominican Republic by Car

    Do you plan on seeing a lot of your new home? Exploring the country by car is probably the best choice for most expats, as it offers the highest degree of flexibility. If you prefer not to buy a car, you can always rent one. Be sure to inquire about the insurance policy: which damages it covers exactly and how high the deductible (i.e. the sum you pay out of your own pocket) is. These questions are important because the road conditions are, in fact, not always great. A flat tire is one of the most common types of car trouble. Should this happen to you, try to get your vehicle to a gomera, a tire repair and retail shop.

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  • Language in the Dominican Republic

    As you'll be aware from the description of the country's historical background in our article on moving to the Dominican Republic, it does not come as a surprise that Spanish is the official language of this country. So, before starting your expat life in the Dominican Republic, you should brush up on your Spanish language skills, even if your business partners speak English. Expats living in the Dominican Republic may find it hard at times to understand the locals, even if they have a basic knowledge of Spanish.

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  • People and Local Customs

    Currently, there are about 10.4 million people living in the Dominican Republic, with a median age of only 27 years; the capital, Santo Domingo, is home to almost three million people. Family values, religion, and hospitality are the cornerstones of life in the Caribbean country, thus, it is not rare that three generations of the same family live under one and the same roof, with the oldest man making the important decisions affecting the entire family.

    Even though the majority of the population is Catholic (with around 57% practicing adherents of that faith), you are obviously free to choose your religion. Dominicans often go out of their way to treat their guests royally and to make them feel particularly welcome. In return, you should be a respectful guest in order not to upset your hosts while living in the Dominican Republic.

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