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Entries from Employment

  • The Business Etiquette

    In the Dominican Republic, it's not what you know, it's who you know! This is why networking, name-dropping, and doing and collecting favors are important aspects of doing business in the Dominican Republic. It is important that you put a lot of work into building trusted relationships. In this endeavor, show your business partners respect and pay close attention to hierarchies.

    Whether you're traveling to the Dominican Republic for a few days or a week, understanding the local business culture can help you build a trusting relationship with local professionals. For the most part, the business culture is fairly relaxed. However, the way locals conduct business might be slightly different from your home country. Therefore, it's important that you master the business etiquette before arriving.

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  • Business (Work) Visa

    Before moving to the Dominican Republic, you need to secure either a business visa (Visa de Negocios), which comes in two forms that allow either one entry for 60 days or multiple entries for one year, but only for a maximum of two consecutive months at a time, or a business visa for employment purposes (Visa de Negocios con Fines Laborales), which is issued for one year. The latter is the relevant visa for those who are moving to the Dominican Republic to work on fixed-term contracts for private or public companies; with this visa you can apply for a driver’s license, open a bank account, etc. You can renew your visa at the Department of Immigration (Dirección General de Migración) in Santo Domingo as long as you still have a valid work contract.

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  • Dominican Republic Residence Permit

    It doesn’t matter if you are moving to the Dominican Republic with a Tourist Card or a business visa. If your stay exceeds two months, you need to apply for a residence permit (Visa de Residencia). To do so, you need to submit the application in advance to a consulate of the Dominican Republic with the following, but be awar following up with Dominican Republic Visa and Residency Permit procedures can be costly, frustrating and time consuming. You should hire a competent lawyer or contact our Corcons office which specializes in immigration and naturalization. All foreign documents must be notarized and translated into Spanish. Also, both the original and the translation must be apostilled:

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  • Taxes on employment

    Dominican-source income received by an employee for their work, as well as income obtained by individuals who exercise a profession or perform freelance work, is subject to income tax. The rate applicable to income tax ranges from 0 to 25% depending on the income received. Employers must withhold income corresponding to their employees’ income tax and social security contributions on a monthly basis and remit it to DGII by the tenth day of every month. Individuals who receive Dominican-source income for independent work must file an annual individual income tax return by 31 March.

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  • Employment in the Dominican Republic

    Employment

    What are the main laws regulating employment relationships?

    The main employment legislation is the Labour Code (No 16-22 of 1992). It applies to Dominicans and foreign persons working in the Dominican Republic. The employer and employee are subject to an employment contract, although its provisions can never release or limit rights under the Labour Code.

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  • Geography and Climate

    The Dominican Republic is the second-largest country in the Caribbean and is located on the island of Hispaniola. The island, which it shares with Haiti, is situated between Cuba and Puerto Rico. Upon moving to the Dominican Republic, you'll recognize that the landscape is surprisingly diverse for such a small country. Obviously you shouldn't miss out on the white sandy beaches, which are so typical for the Caribbean, but the country also boasts tropical rainforests, beautiful valleys, rivers, lakes, and even semi-desert zones.

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  • The Job Search

    As in most other countries, working in the Dominican Republic requires some determination. Search local newspapers like the Listín Diario for job ads. They are usually listed under "Empleos" but may also be scattered all over the paper. Be sure to skim through the entire newspaper to avoid missing an interesting post. If you come across ads which do not specifically state what the job is about, you should be suspicious. More often than not, these ads are for rather dubious jobs. Your embassy or consulate, as well as your country's chamber of commerce, might also have a list of businesses and companies looking for employees from your home country.

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  • Dominican Republic's Economy

    It hasn't just been the tourism and travel sector but also the establishment of free trade zones that have given the economy a significant boost. The latter have attracted foreign investors, who have contributed to economic growth and created new jobs for locals and foreigners working in the Dominican Republic. These zones mostly focus on production in the fields of textiles, electronics, pharmaceuticals, and tobacco products.

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  • Free Trade Zones

    There are over 46 industrial free zones in the Dominican Republic, with more of them under development. About 500 companies operate in the free trade zones, offering employment to around 200,000 people. The free trade zones play an important role in the Dominican economy. After all, 70% of all Dominican exports come from industries and businesses within the free trade zones.

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  • The Workforce

    The Dominican Republic’s workforce of over 4.9 million people is often considered the country’s greatest economic asset, according to various independent surveys. Employees are said to be hard-working, trainable, and skillful — even though the government spends minimally on education.

    Approximately 64% of all people working in the Dominican Republic are employed by the government or work in the services sector; 15% of the labor force is working in the Dominican Republic’s agriculture sector; the industry sector, predominantly manufacturing, employs about 22% of the entire workforce. Unfortunately, the unemployment rate is still at an alarming 14%.

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  • Language in the Dominican Republic

    As you'll be aware from the description of the country's historical background in our article on moving to the Dominican Republic, it does not come as a surprise that Spanish is the official language of this country. So, before starting your expat life in the Dominican Republic, you should brush up on your Spanish language skills, even if your business partners speak English. Expats living in the Dominican Republic may find it hard at times to understand the locals, even if they have a basic knowledge of Spanish.

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We look forward to assisting you in making the right decision of changing your life and empowering your future in the Dominican Republic.