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Entries from Immigration and Naturalization

  • Education for Expat Children

    If you are planning on living in the Dominican Republic with your family, you'll be happy to learn that there are plenty of educational opportunities for expat children. The many different multinational schools offer instruction in a variety of languages other than Spanish. Schools in the Dominican Republic are based on a Spanish educational model. Both English and French are taught as secondary languages on private and public schools. Haitian Creole is spoken by the population of Haitian origin. However, even at these schools, the majority of the student body might be Dominican, which usually means the language spoken during breaks is Spanish.

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  • Business (Work) Visa

    Before moving to the Dominican Republic, you need to secure either a business visa (Visa de Negocios), which comes in two forms that allow either one entry for 60 days or multiple entries for one year, but only for a maximum of two consecutive months at a time, or a business visa for employment purposes (Visa de Negocios con Fines Laborales), which is issued for one year. The latter is the relevant visa for those who are moving to the Dominican Republic to work on fixed-term contracts for private or public companies; with this visa you can apply for a driver’s license, open a bank account, etc. You can renew your visa at the Department of Immigration (Dirección General de Migración) in Santo Domingo as long as you still have a valid work contract.

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  • Dominican Republic Residence Permit

    It doesn’t matter if you are moving to the Dominican Republic with a Tourist Card or a business visa. If your stay exceeds two months, you need to apply for a residence permit (Visa de Residencia). To do so, you need to submit the application in advance to a consulate of the Dominican Republic with the following, but be awar following up with Dominican Republic Visa and Residency Permit procedures can be costly, frustrating and time consuming. You should hire a competent lawyer or contact our Corcons office which specializes in immigration and naturalization. All foreign documents must be notarized and translated into Spanish. Also, both the original and the translation must be apostilled:

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  • The Job Search

    As in most other countries, working in the Dominican Republic requires some determination. Search local newspapers like the Listín Diario for job ads. They are usually listed under "Empleos" but may also be scattered all over the paper. Be sure to skim through the entire newspaper to avoid missing an interesting post. If you come across ads which do not specifically state what the job is about, you should be suspicious. More often than not, these ads are for rather dubious jobs. Your embassy or consulate, as well as your country's chamber of commerce, might also have a list of businesses and companies looking for employees from your home country.

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We look forward to assisting you in making the right decision of changing your life and empowering your future in the Dominican Republic.