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Entries tagged as employment

  • The Business Etiquette

    In the Dominican Republic, it's not what you know, it's who you know! This is why networking, name-dropping, and doing and collecting favors are important aspects of doing business in the Dominican Republic. It is important that you put a lot of work into building trusted relationships. In this endeavor, show your business partners respect and pay close attention to hierarchies.

    Whether you're traveling to the Dominican Republic for a few days or a week, understanding the local business culture can help you build a trusting relationship with local professionals. For the most part, the business culture is fairly relaxed. However, the way locals conduct business might be slightly different from your home country. Therefore, it's important that you master the business etiquette before arriving.

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  • Business (Work) Visa

    Before moving to the Dominican Republic, you need to secure either a business visa (Visa de Negocios), which comes in two forms that allow either one entry for 60 days or multiple entries for one year, but only for a maximum of two consecutive months at a time, or a business visa for employment purposes (Visa de Negocios con Fines Laborales), which is issued for one year. The latter is the relevant visa for those who are moving to the Dominican Republic to work on fixed-term contracts for private or public companies; with this visa you can apply for a driver’s license, open a bank account, etc. You can renew your visa at the Department of Immigration (Dirección General de Migración) in Santo Domingo as long as you still have a valid work contract.

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  • Dominican Local Food Culture

    Dominican cuisine is heavily influenced by its Spanish roots but includes a touch of local Caribbean spices and herbs. While spending your life in the Dominican Republic, try some dishes that are prepared a la criolla or guisado, which means the meat or seafood is served in a tomato sauce with garlic, olives, onion, and cilantro.

    Dominicans also particularly enjoy all types of fried dishes such as carne frita (fried pork chunks) or chicharrones de pollo (Dominican fried chicken) with plantains dipped in salt water and fried in vegetable oil. This fondness for fried food is also reflected in a typical Dominican breakfast, which contains mashed plantains (mangú) with onions, fried white cheese, fried eggs, and orange juice.

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  • Dominican Healthcare System

    Unfortunately, vacation doesn't always go as planned and some visitors do need Health Care in The Dominican Republic during their holiday. Tourists that end up in a Dominican Republic Hospital most time became sick due to food poising, accidents or diseases. But don’t worry the Dominican Republic has the largest healthcare system in the Caribbean. Here you will find all you need to know about Health Care in the Dominican Republic. The Dominican healthcare system has been undergoing reforms since 2001, which is good news for everyone involved. The old system was underfunded, inefficient, low quality, and resulted in a lot of out-of-pocket expenses for the patients — even the poorest of Dominican society.

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  • Dominican Republic Residence Permit

    It doesn’t matter if you are moving to the Dominican Republic with a Tourist Card or a business visa. If your stay exceeds two months, you need to apply for a residence permit (Visa de Residencia). To do so, you need to submit the application in advance to a consulate of the Dominican Republic with the following, but be awar following up with Dominican Republic Visa and Residency Permit procedures can be costly, frustrating and time consuming. You should hire a competent lawyer or contact our Corcons office which specializes in immigration and naturalization. All foreign documents must be notarized and translated into Spanish. Also, both the original and the translation must be apostilled:

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  • 25 Best Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

    Surrounded by hundreds of miles of beaches, the Dominican Republic is the epitome of a perfect island getaway. The sun-drenched the Dominican Republic shares the Caribbean island of Hispaniola with Haiti, occupying the larger eastern section of the island. In addition to enjoying a multitude of water sports, you can also spend some time learning about the interesting history of the state and admiring the colonial architecture in the Zona Colonial in the city of Santa Domingo.

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  • What you need to know to start a business in the Dominican Republic

    The Dominican Republic is the second largest country in the Caribbean region by area. Tourism, agriculture, mining and textiles are among the key sectors of the economy making it an attractive location to start your business. But, there can be challenges if you don’t know the specifics of the local processes.

    In the Dominican Republic, there are four types of entities that you may choose for your business, a Limited Liability company, Individual Enterprise of Limited Liability company, a Joint Stock company or a Simplified Joint Stock company. 

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  • Taxes on employment

    Dominican-source income received by an employee for their work, as well as income obtained by individuals who exercise a profession or perform freelance work, is subject to income tax. The rate applicable to income tax ranges from 0 to 25% depending on the income received. Employers must withhold income corresponding to their employees’ income tax and social security contributions on a monthly basis and remit it to DGII by the tenth day of every month. Individuals who receive Dominican-source income for independent work must file an annual individual income tax return by 31 March.

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  • Employment in the Dominican Republic

    Employment

    What are the main laws regulating employment relationships?

    The main employment legislation is the Labour Code (No 16-22 of 1992). It applies to Dominicans and foreign persons working in the Dominican Republic. The employer and employee are subject to an employment contract, although its provisions can never release or limit rights under the Labour Code.

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  • Legal System of Dominican Republic

    The Comptroller General, who is appointed by the President, exercises internal control of the administration and of public funds. The Court of Accounts, whose judges are nominated by the President and elected by the Senate, exercises external control. The President must submit each year’s accounts to the National Congress, which either approves or rejects the statement of earnings from taxes and fees and investment of revenues that the Executive Branch must submit to it.

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  • Local laws and customs

    Don’t become involved with illegal drugs of any kind. There are severe penalties for all drug offences. Cases can take several years to go through the judicial process, during which the accused person is likely to be held in detention. Possession of even small quantities can lead to a long prison sentence and a hefty fine. All sentences are served in the Dominican Republic.

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We look forward to assisting you in making the right decision of changing your life and empowering your future in the Dominican Republic.