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Entries tagged as immigration and naturalization

  • Dominican Republic Residence Permit

    It doesn’t matter if you are moving to the Dominican Republic with a Tourist Card or a business visa. If your stay exceeds two months, you need to apply for a residence permit (Visa de Residencia). To do so, you need to submit the application in advance to a consulate of the Dominican Republic with the following, but be awar following up with Dominican Republic Visa and Residency Permit procedures can be costly, frustrating and time consuming. You should hire a competent lawyer or contact our Corcons office which specializes in immigration and naturalization. All foreign documents must be notarized and translated into Spanish. Also, both the original and the translation must be apostilled:

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  • 25 Best Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

    Surrounded by hundreds of miles of beaches, the Dominican Republic is the epitome of a perfect island getaway. The sun-drenched the Dominican Republic shares the Caribbean island of Hispaniola with Haiti, occupying the larger eastern section of the island. In addition to enjoying a multitude of water sports, you can also spend some time learning about the interesting history of the state and admiring the colonial architecture in the Zona Colonial in the city of Santa Domingo.

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  • 5 reasons to look at Dominican Republic for your business

    Five centuries after Christopher Colombus, Seedstars set up foot on Santo Domingo for the very first time, adding the Caribbean to its map of emerging tech hubs. Great news!

    Traveling to a paradisiac island to look for promising startups across beaches, coconut and colorful fishes sounded like a dream.

    And while we were very excited to go to the Dominican Republic for its incredible bio-ecosystem and fairytale landscapes, we never expected to find an El Dorado of opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship as well.

    Understandably, the Dominican startup ecosystem is still at an early stage. For example, you will not yet find many investors willing to bet on the island’s talent pool, nor established public and private support structures for entrepreneurs.

    But things are starting to move, and besides those shortcomings, the Dominican Republic is definitely a place to consider for doing business.

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  • Doing business in the Dominican Republic

    This article gives an overview of key recent developments affecting doing business in Dominican Republic as well as an introduction to the legal system; foreign investment, including restrictions, currency regulations and incentives and business vehicles and their relevant restrictions and liabilities. The article also summarizes the laws regulating employment relationships, including redundancies and mass layoffs, and provides short overviews on competition law, data protection, and product liability and safety. In addition, there are comprehensive summaries on taxation and tax residency, and intellectual property rights over patents, trade marks, registered and unregistered designs.

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  • Advice about Dominican Republic's Healthcare

    Wondering about healthcare services available in the Dominican Republic and how to access them? Find out in this article.

    If you are moving to the Dominican Republic, one of your major concerns is likely to be what the healthcare system is like and what services are available. The country does have an excellent healthcare service, but only in some places, so you should take this into account when deciding where to live.

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  • What you need to know to start a business in the Dominican Republic

    The Dominican Republic is the second largest country in the Caribbean region by area. Tourism, agriculture, mining and textiles are among the key sectors of the economy making it an attractive location to start your business. But, there can be challenges if you don’t know the specifics of the local processes.

    In the Dominican Republic, there are four types of entities that you may choose for your business, a Limited Liability company, Individual Enterprise of Limited Liability company, a Joint Stock company or a Simplified Joint Stock company. 

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  • Employment in the Dominican Republic

    Employment

    What are the main laws regulating employment relationships?

    The main employment legislation is the Labour Code (No 16-22 of 1992). It applies to Dominicans and foreign persons working in the Dominican Republic. The employer and employee are subject to an employment contract, although its provisions can never release or limit rights under the Labour Code.

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  • Legal System of Dominican Republic

    The Comptroller General, who is appointed by the President, exercises internal control of the administration and of public funds. The Court of Accounts, whose judges are nominated by the President and elected by the Senate, exercises external control. The President must submit each year’s accounts to the National Congress, which either approves or rejects the statement of earnings from taxes and fees and investment of revenues that the Executive Branch must submit to it.

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  • Local laws and customs

    Don’t become involved with illegal drugs of any kind. There are severe penalties for all drug offences. Cases can take several years to go through the judicial process, during which the accused person is likely to be held in detention. Possession of even small quantities can lead to a long prison sentence and a hefty fine. All sentences are served in the Dominican Republic.

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  • Business (Work) Visa

    Before moving to the Dominican Republic, you need to secure either a business visa (Visa de Negocios), which comes in two forms that allow either one entry for 60 days or multiple entries for one year, but only for a maximum of two consecutive months at a time, or a business visa for employment purposes (Visa de Negocios con Fines Laborales), which is issued for one year. The latter is the relevant visa for those who are moving to the Dominican Republic to work on fixed-term contracts for private or public companies; with this visa you can apply for a driver’s license, open a bank account, etc. You can renew your visa at the Department of Immigration (Dirección General de Migración) in Santo Domingo as long as you still have a valid work contract.

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  • Moving to the Dominican Republic

    Does moving to the Dominican Republic sound like an option for you? The country, located on the eastern half of Hispaniola Island, offers much more than just palm trees and sunshine. Read our articles to the Dominican Republic and find out all about the country, visas, housing, and more.
    In any cases, movingto another country is an important decision and there are many things to take into account before packing all your belongings.

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Corcons is not only a awesome immigration assistance.

We look forward to assisting you in making the right decision of changing your life and empowering your future in the Dominican Republic.